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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2007 12:08 am    Post subject: Message to Ryan Reply with quote

Here is a copy of our conversation. I think it sheds some important light on an important topic:

Yeah, YSis on the 1st fret and so on. Good there!

Okay, now for the next part. You said what I wrote about major chords having personalities was confusing. Well, you are overlooking something vital. When you said that you couldn't see how YSis could sound different from OSis, because they are both just major chords...that tells me you are missing something. Let me tell you what it is you're missing. The thing that makes YSis YSis is the fact that she sits two frets away from another major chord. Which is to say that she sits one fret away from a minor chord if you move the other direction. I could keep pointing out how far away from each of the other 7 chords in the family, but I hope that's enough for you to get the big point: She is who she is because of where she sits in relation to where all the others are. In other words, that location in the pattern is her personality. In a way, it's just like you or me...take away all the people we have relationships with and we're just the prototypical white male, etc, etc. But put us into the real world with relationships to people and you will see who we really are. Get it? Yeah, you kind of pointed that out in your next few lines. So, that is what you really need to capitalize on...that concept.

As far as putting it to good use so you can really see it and learn it for good, I think you need to watch very carefully my chapter on the study of the "home" chord. It's the chapter called "Relatives & Modes". You really, really have to learn how to make a chord progression that resolves to the home chord of the mode you are trying to play in, or you are not going to capture the flag on modes. I poured my wisdom real hard into that chapter. It's crucial that you give it as big a chance as possible. Watch it 100 times if that's what it takes. Let it soak into your very last brain cell.

And let me tell you this gold-plated piece of advice: You are practically nothing on the guitar until you master chords the way you are hoping to master soloing. I really mean it! I used to pour all I had into soloing and think that it was all right there. Many, many years later, when the windy days of my foolish youth settled down and I finally rested my tired eyes on what I had been ignoring for so long...then I grew into the giant I thought I already was and realized what a midget I used to be. I can't tell you how true these few lines are, but they belong in the guitar guru hall of fame. And if you will just listen to my hard earned wisdom, you will cover ground well beyond your years.

This is such potent stuff, I'm going to paste it into my forum.
Fred
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 1:59 am    Post subject: More conversations with Ryan Reply with quote

Here is another group of messages that contain some information that might be useful to others:

As for solo phrasing, the golden rule is this: As long as your solo phrases end on a note that is actually in the chord that's being played the very moment the phrase ends, it will sound like you are speaking with authority. Memorize that guru statement. It actually is so true that it transcends the truth about any scale, key change, etc. You can even break the rules all you want if you just use that fact.

Here is a truth about chords: Playing chords is like soloing many notes at a time. But, of course, you don't move as fast from place to place as with soloing. The real point here is that your chords are made of nothing but notes chosen from the solo pattern. If any one of your notes doesn't come from the solo pattern you will hear some odd, shittiness in your chord...and whoever's soloing will probably look up and wonder what went wrong.

Now, as for making chords move, there is a method to the madness. You really have to just experiment and find what moves you like the best. But one of my alltime favorites is to go back and forth between Papa and YSis. I just love the sound of soloing over those two chords. And after you have moved back and forth between those two a bunch of times, you replace Papa with Mama and replace YSis with YBro. You do that a few times and then go back to Papa - YSis. Continuing to cycle through that set will be more than enough music to entertain your ears for hours.

You really need to get into the repetition that causes chords to seem like they are going places. You have to actually repeat enough times to sort of hypnotize your audience until, finally, when you do move, it really seems like something is happening. Have you ever listened to Pink Floyd: Shine On You Crazy Diamond? That's a great example of the power of staying in virtually one place for a long, hyptnotic time so that eventually even the simplest move is easily appreciated. Get into that concept...

You asked about what makes a chord? You mentioned intervals? Well, yeah, when you play the family of chords right, you are playing the intervals all correctly, only you don't have to understand a whole lot about it. That's the gift of the family of chords. Just play them right, put them in the rigth place relative to one another and play the solo pattern they all actually make on the fretboard and you got it.

Here's a thought. Did you know that if you when from one end of the fretboard and stamped paint on all the notes that are in each chord, one chord at a time, when you got all the way to the other end of the fretboard, you would be seeing the entire map, just as you would draw it for soloing? That's a testament to the fact that the chords and the solo map are one in the same. Chords are like cross-sections/slices of the solo pattern.

Let me know if any of these points helps you.
Fred

----- Original Message -----
From: Ryan
To: "Pool"
Sent: Monday, October 22, 2007 9:17 AM
Subject: RE:


Ok my man...i finally got back to a computer. Thank you for replaying I really appreciate that, you do not even know. Yes i do know how to spiral map...i do it 5 times every time i pick up the guitar before i do anything else. I just do not have to fret board memorized such as i do the penatonic scale(when it comes to the spiral mapping...i do itevery day all the way down to fret 20..)...the only one i do have fully memorized is Aminor, and most of Dminor...both as papa. But its taking longer than i want...like every time i move to the next chord and try learning the mode and scale it flusters me and I know there has to be an easier way of looking at it and i am obviously not seeing it. I was just asking for a cheat tip...lol a secret to help me memorize quicker, if not, then well i guess i will just continue what i am doing. The way I have been memorizing is by memorizing where the Home chord(home notes) are on the fret board...and then the pattern of course...and i guess the easiest way to memorize a scale is to keep playing in it, correct? I think I understand you when you talk about the chord changes down the fret board. Such as how to name them...but how do i know where to put my fingers..do i just put them wherever there are good notes and that is considered a chord? Do i use the intervels? I mean dont get me wrong i could sit there are screw around with it, which i do a lot, but it is a lot easier when you know the exact way to do things. Ok my man...i know a lot of my questions have to do with soloing...but trust me i play chords just as much now. But i dohave one more question about soloing...lets just say im playing by my self or with a chord player(it doesnt really matter) whats a good way of looking at putting phrases together? Like if he is playing papa wnd fret, mama 5th, and ybro 7th....how should i incorperate my notes...start low and them jump high? landing on the home note? I tend to slide to much...i dont know it is kind of a silly question but maybe you have some good tips? Alright i gotta go do some writing crap, ha ha, c ya man. Have a killer day.

________________________________

From: Pool
Sent: Sun 10/21/2007 8:34 PM
To: Ryan
Subject: Re:



So, you're wanting to know how to locate and name each chord according to
Papa, Mama etc? Well, have you ever played the riff from Crazy Train? I'm
using that as an example because I assume you have. Well, you are playing
the riff with two bridge sets, right? I hope so. That's how I play it.
Anyway, anytime you are on that first note that starts the 1st row bridge
set, you are at the root of Papa. That means, using that root as the top of
the chord, you play a minor right there. That's how it works. Each note in
the scale is the root of a chord. If you ask yourself what set that note
starts, and you have them memorized, then you'll know what family member it
is. And that will tell you whether to make it a major or minor chord.
That's the game plan. Let me know if that makes sense.
Fred

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ryan
To: "Pool"
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 8:49 AM
Subject: RE:


Alright Fred,

This is definately going in a good direction....and I totally understand.
Another couple questions. I understand the chords and how they are
positioned dictates what they really are...so what is the rule with the
chord progression...such as does papa, mama, ybro have to be relative to
eachother every time...or can you skip every two chords? I guess I'am
asking how should i go about putting chords together, there has to be a rule
on that. Also on the classical chords(open chords) how do you name those?
Aminor(is like mama? or what?) Last question...this excites me the most
because of your chord "speech"(i was enthused by that)...I want to learn the
fret board and the chords--family of hierarchy--i looked into that on your
site but i was getting sort of confused..I guess i'am just asking to learn
some new chords..i know each chord(like aminor and so on have like 3 or 4
positions on the fret board) but i have no clue where they are or how to
find them or even how to name them(papa, mama, ect...) so if you could give
me anything usefull on that i would be pumped...thanx fredness...You are the
man and you do not even know how much i appreciate all of this. Thanx man.

-Ryan


________________________________

From: Pool
Sent: Thu 10/11/2007 5:04 PM
To: Ryan
Subject: Re:



Yeah, YSis on the 1st fret and so on. Good there!

Okay, now for the next part. You said what I wrote about major chords
having personalities was confusing. Well, you are overlooking something
vital. When you said that you couldn't see how YSis could sound different
from OSis, because they are both just major chords...that tells me you are
missing something. Let me tell you what it is you're missing. The thing
that makes YSis YSis is the fact that she sits two frets away from another
major chord. Which is to say that she sits one fret away from a minor chord
if you move the other direction. I could keep pointing out how far away
from each of the other 7 chords in the family, but I hope that's enough for
you to get the big point: She is who she is because of where she sits in
relation to where all the others are. In other words, that location in the
pattern is her personality. In a way, it's just like you or me...take away
all the people we have relationships with and we're just the prototypical
white male, etc, etc. But put us into the real world with relationships to
people and you will see who we really are. Get it? Yeah, you kind of
pointed that out in your next few lines. So, that is what you really need
to capitalize on...that concept.

As far as putting it to good use so you can really see it and learn it for
good, I think you need to watch very carefully my chapter on the study of
the "home" chord. It's the chapter called "Relatives & Modes". You really,
really have to learn how to make a chord progression that resolves to the
home chord of the mode you are trying to play in, or you are not going to
capture the flag on modes. I poured my wisdom real hard into that chapter.
It's crucial that you give it as big a chance as possible. Watch it 100
times if that's what it takes. Let it soak into your very last brain cell.

And let me tell you this gold-plated piece of advice: You are practically
nothing on the guitar until you master chords the way you are hoping to
master soloing. I really mean it! I used to pour all I had into soloing
and think that it was all right there. Many, many years later, when the
windy days of my foolish youth settled down and I finally rested my tired
eyes on what I had been ignoring for so long...then I grew into the giant I
thought I already was and realized what a midget I used to be. I can't tell
you how true these few lines are, but they belong in the guitar guru hall of
fame. And if you will just listen to my hard earned wisdom, you will cover
ground well beyond your years.

This is such potent stuff, I'm going to paste it into my forum.
Fred

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ryan
To: "Pool"
Sent: Thursday, October 11, 2007 7:18 AM
Subject: RE:


Alright Fred,

I'am pretty excited about what you just wrote me because I believe exactly
what you are saying and I do feel like I'am at the verge of something sweet.
As far as your question goes, I think the first fret would be ysis(last row
triple) then it would go osis(1st row triple) then Papa at the 5th(1st
bridge)..I think I understand the mode thing. I have read about it before.
It is all the same scale but just a different starting point, so it is the
same scale but just has a different sound to it, correct? Also you told me
the different sound for each chord...but that is what is pretty
confusing...because the girl chords are the major chords and the males are
minor...(same form)...sooo i dont get how osis can have a certain sound
wherever you put it compared to ysis..because they are the same
chord....unless you know where to put them? Then that is when they become
different....correct? I'am at the verge and i know it...i have my skills
down, (pretty decent speed) ( my chords, need to work on my diminished) the
understanding up spiral mapping and jumping, and I have been studying the
whole fret board so i know where each note is where)...so im really excited
to hear what you have to say...bring it on Fred, i think i will definately
understand it...so i hope all is well and i am excited to hearing from you.
Every day i check my email i just pray that you replied, lol...its all i can
look forward to these days. Anyhow thanx again...c ya fredness guruist
freako shredder genious!!! ha...later man.

-Ryan

________________________________

From: Pool
Sent: Wed 10/10/2007 4:47 PM
To: Ryan
Subject: Re:



Okay, I want you to know that you are on the verge of something very
important. The question is there, right now. And you really want the
answer. So, something really awesome could happen if I get the answer to
you. I guarantee I have the answer. I just don't know if I can get it to
you in text.

By the way, I can't do text messaging without being charged. So, no go with
that. But as for e-mail and phone...all good.

Now, about me having the answer...my only worry is that I will put it in too
many words and you will drift off and fall asleep or not get it somehow. I
believe it can be done, but it takes both of us. You having the desire and
your mind ready for this (I can tell by your questions) is probably the most
important part. So, let me see about the answer here:

Let me train your mind about the things you already know. Here's a question
for you: If you have a first row bridge set on the 5th fret (top string)
what set starts at the 1st fret? You may have to spiral map backwards or
something to figure it out real quick...or, if you just know the pattern
real well...Now, what chord would you play on the 5th fret and what chord
would you play on the 1st? I need to know if you know the answer before I
can continue.

And, here is a set of information that might interest you:
Papa sounds like a very strong minor/dark mood. (metal, like crazy train)
Mama sounds like a very strong major/happy (countryish)
YBro sounds like a minor, but a little happier (think "I Don't Know" by
Ozzy, or Santana's "Evil Ways") It sounds kind of bluesy but in a minor
way.
OBro sounds more like mild spanish (some metal, like Ynygwy
Malstein...however you spell it)
YSis sounds very major but a little weird (not a whole lot of music out
there in that mode/scale) Actually the Simpson's theme song is in this mode.
OSis sounds very bluesy/jazzy. The main theme to that song "Pretty
Woman"...al la Van Halen
Adopted Boy is pretty trippy and evil sounding. Think Black Sabbath, Black
Sabbath. Or The Beautiful People

You do know that all these "scales" you mentioned...7 different "scales" are
really "modes" because they are all the same scale, just focused on a
different "home chord". If you don't know what I mean, that is exactly
where we need to conquer your understanding first. Then it will all make
sense.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ryan
To: "Pool"
Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2007 7:20 AM
Subject: RE:


I just read over the last email i sent you..its kind of hard to ask what i
want to know...Because there are 7 different possibilites of starting
positions on one fret...(first head set, second head set, first bridge,
second bridge, ect...so that would be 7 different scales, correct? I tried
a new one on the 5th fret last night(A)...it started with second triple
block(mama) and it sounded pretty good...I have messed around a lot with
first fret(F) and i start with first triple block(ysis)? or is that
wrong...anyways I i just play and alot of the time no matter where i start
it sounds familiar(the sound) but when i record myself I can tell the
difference a lot more...I dont know if it is my ear or what...so i guess
what I'am asking is; how do i decide what sound i want? Spanish/mexican,
Country, rock? Blues is more of the penatonic correct? I have been running
with these scales....and they sound good, but I want to be able to choose
exactly what sort style i want th play at the time...so if you could please
help with that i would be set...such as certain sets of chords and the
patterns that go with...you would be a life saver to help with this...thanx
fred. I guess i could research it but i think i just trust you a whole lot
more than anyone or anything else. Thanx fred, hope all is well.
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2007 1:52 am    Post subject: More... Reply with quote

Anyway, I want to ask you a series of questions to see how fully your understanding of this system is. Ready? You must pass this test before I will give you the secrets of Harmonic Minor, etc.

Questions: I tell you that the first row bridge set is on the 7th fret (always assume I mean top string, unless I say otherwise).
1. Tell me where all the family members are (name the fret and family member together) on the top string for one octave.
2. On the A string, name one fret where you can find the root of ABoy?
3. Give me some kind of diagram or good text explanation that shows how you would play the shape of ABoy rooted on that A string location.
4. Moving up the top string only from open to the point where you run out of frets, on what frets would you put all the notes?
5. Moving up the top string only from open to the point where you run out of frets, on what frets would you put all the pentatonic (only) notes?

I could keep going, but these 5 questions really cover a lot of ground. I'll be interested to see your answers. I don't doubt you...I'm just having fun.
Fred
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 7:22 am    Post subject: Another message to Ryan Reply with quote

rYaN,
Yes, you are playing a correct form of ABoy in the diagram you just sent. What you are voicing in that chord are just the root-3rd-5th-octave of the chord. Let me elaborate:
----------------------------
----------------------------
------------4--------------- this root holds an octave of the 3rd from the root...start at the root, call it "1" and go up to three...then this is an octave of that.
------------6--------------- this string just holds an octave of the root...so nothing special...
------------5--------------- this string holds the 5th of ABoy (you get that by starting at the root and counting up, where root is "1" and go up to "5"
------------4--------------- this string holds the "root" of ABoy

So, you ask "why" a person would play different forms of ABoy? Well, at the most simple level, the answer is "because they sound different" and in one mood I might like one over the other. But to get technical about it, when you voice other notes, besides the "basic" ones (like in the diagram above) you get a richer sound. I guess you could say that by playing more than just the 1-3-5 you are spelling out more of the pattern for the ear to enjoy. So, you take this form:

----------------------------
----------------------------
------------4---------------
------------4--------------- this string is now voicing the 7th of ABoy! Yeah, yeah...count up from the root and you'll end up on this note.
------------5---------------
------------4---------------

It's still the same chord, you are just voicing another note along with the primitive ones. What that allows the soloist to do is end his phrases on another note, the 7th. Remember that with phrasing if you always end your phrases on a note that is in the chord being played at that moment, you will sound as though you speak with authority. So, you might get tired of only having 3 notes (1-3-5) to choose from when ending your phrases, so the chord player starts playing richer chords and you suddenly have more options (1-3-5-7). Down the road you might get crazy and be playing 1-3-5-7-9 chords. There are even 13th chords. And it's got a lot to do with having more options. But, the drawback to that kind of sound is that it becomes so rich that it almost becomes foggy. Like a dish with so many spices that you don't know what to think or how to enjoy it. One way to solve that problem is to use arpeggios. You know, broken chords. By breaking up these rich chords...plucking one string at a time, you sort of feed the ear the chord in little bites instead of cramming it all together. And you still get to use your rich chords. I do that a lot.

Is this making any sense? You can add any available note in the pattern to whatever chord you are playing...as long as it's in the pattern. If you can see them, try voicing them with your chord. You might discover a chord form you can't live without.

Now, when it comes to adding that special "bad" note that I am addicted to (#OSis), then we come to this form of ABoy, which is the ultimate:

----------------------------
----------------------------
------------4---------------
------------3--------------- this string is now voicing #OSis! All the other notes are part of the unaltered pattern, but this one is exotic.
------------5---------------
------------4---------------

The exotic note, #OSis unlocks the harmonic minor scale and the diminished scale. It adds so much intensity to your chord progressions if you know how to use it. You simply must grow in this direction. This is what the rSoG method was born for...to show you and I to this and the gates beyond it.

Fred
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